Concerns Integrating Eritrean Migrants in the Netherlands

Video: Concerns Integrating Eritrean Migrants in the Netherlands

Concerns Integrating Eritrean Refugees in the Netherlands

 

Christel Roach | www.nos.nl |  December 21, 2015

 

"When it comes to integration of refugees, there is no time to lose", so say the Social and Cultural Planning Office (SCP), the Research and Documentation Centre (WODC) and the Scientific Council for Government Policy (WRR) in their recently published Policy Brief. Also within the Eritrean community are concerned about the difficult integration.

Nieuwsuur talks with dozens of Eritrean refugees. Some even stay in a refugee center, others have a home. They say long hours to spend at home and finding it difficult to find contact with Dutch people. 

 

In our culture, we look away when someone speaks to us, and we often walk with our heads bowed. That is quite different from the Dutch culture.

Legese – 1.5 years ago fled from Eritrea

Arrears

Many refugees have an unfavorable labor market position and are closing slowly, according to the study by the SCP, WODC and WRR. After a two-year stay in the Netherlands, only a quarter of the refugees paid work for more than eight hours per week. Partly for this reason, the parties find that there is no time to lose. "It is necessary to prevent a large number of status holders prolonged dependence on foreign assistance as is happening too often." They also want churches to regain a more active role to accelerate the integration.


Within the Eritrean community there are concerns about the integration into Dutch society NIEUWSUUR


Many Eritrean refugees are not used to being open NIEUWSUUR


First meeting in Utrecht for refugees from Eritrea NIEUWSUUR


Eritreans are the second largest group of refugees seeking asylum here, after the Syrians NIEUWSUUR

Shy

Michale Hadush comes from Eritrea and eleven months ago fled to the Netherlands. He sees how many Eritrean refugees in Utrecht linger long in inaction and worries about their future in the Netherlands: "Many of us sit at home all day, doing nothing, receive benefits and are hardly in action, we must deal with Dutch. talk, learn the language and develop our talents. We isolate us and that is really not good. "

"We are shy and afraid. In our culture, we look away when someone speaks to us, and we often walk with our heads bowed. That is very different from the Dutch culture. We must learn that we are here freely and allowed to express our opinion . We need to gain self-confidence, "says Legese who came to the Netherlands 1.5 years ago.  

Open in Eritrea are not expected. Indeed, his opening was seen as a danger.

Sennay Ghebreab – fled 30 years ago from Eritrea

Lack of trust 

According Sennay Ghebreab there is a difference between the Syrian and Eritrean refugees. Syrian refugees have more confidence and more confidence in each other and Dutch increasing. "That trust is among the new Eritrean refugees do not exist." Sennay Ghebreab fled 30 years ago to the Netherlands.He is now a neuroscientist and head of social science at the University of Amsterdam. Ghebreab explains that many Eritrean refugees are not used to being open. "Open in Eritrea are not expected. In fact, his opening was seen as a threat."

Military dictatorship

Eritrea is a military dictatorship and is called the North Korea of ​​Africa. President Afewerki ruled the country with an iron hand. All men under 50 should be in the army, and that is often indefinitely. The country is not at war, so in practice the service often comes down to the long-term follow-up of orders from a military leader. Criticism of the government will be punished and among the population a culture of fear. That fear we feel when we Eritreans solicit their flight pattern.Many of us dare to say anything about the political situation in their homeland. 

Legese, which is one of the few well over dares talk says cautiously: "Perhaps, I'm not sure, but maybe they are afraid their relatives in Eritrea something happens when they talk that they are in prison, or. other problems get the Eritrean regime. " 

They need to build confidence and have a lot of contact with Dutch. Otherwise, the integration will take a long time.

Michale Hadush – Initiator foundation Mexeana

Confidence

To activate for Eritreans is Michale Hadush started his own initiative,  Mexeana foundation. He tries Dutch volunteers and Eritrean refugees get together to ensure that the Eritrean refugees can quickly turning it into Dutch society. "We need to motivate Eritreans, they have to build confidence and have a lot of contact with Dutch. Otherwise, the integration will take a long time," Michale fears. 

Invest

Hadush organizes the meetings in Utrecht now voluntary, but hopes that municipalities recognize the need and are actively helping. "The faster it goes, the faster the Eritreans also be able to contribute something." 

Also Sennay Ghebrab hopes that one realizes that it is necessary to invest to make them of value for Dutch society: "When I was young, there is also invested in me It helped me to master Dutch well. and it has brought me to where I am now. " 

 

Software Translation from Dutch

Concerns Integrating Eritrean Migrants in the Netherlands